Freshly Brewed: The Coffee Podcast for Home Brewers

Coffee Education, Accessibility, and YouTube with Kyle Rowsell

April 28, 2021 Brian Renshaw Episode 1
Freshly Brewed: The Coffee Podcast for Home Brewers
Coffee Education, Accessibility, and YouTube with Kyle Rowsell
Chapters
Freshly Brewed: The Coffee Podcast for Home Brewers
Coffee Education, Accessibility, and YouTube with Kyle Rowsell
Apr 28, 2021 Episode 1
Brian Renshaw

Today I have the privilege of sitting down to chat with Kyle Rowsell. Kyle has been creating coffee content for about a year now on Instagram and YouTube but has been helping others brew wonderful coffee at home way before that.

Kyle is one of the most open and enthusiastic people in the coffee social media world. I loved hearing about his passion to teach others about coffee, his creative process, and some things he would like to see in the future of the coffee industry.

Links:

Leave a Review: https://ratethispodcast.com/freshlybrewed

Show Notes Transcript

Today I have the privilege of sitting down to chat with Kyle Rowsell. Kyle has been creating coffee content for about a year now on Instagram and YouTube but has been helping others brew wonderful coffee at home way before that.

Kyle is one of the most open and enthusiastic people in the coffee social media world. I loved hearing about his passion to teach others about coffee, his creative process, and some things he would like to see in the future of the coffee industry.

Links:

Leave a Review: https://ratethispodcast.com/freshlybrewed

Brian Renshaw: Hey, and welcome to the first episode of Freshly Brewed:

The Coffee Podcast for Home Brewers. I'm your host, Brian Renshaw, and in each episode, I sit down with a coffee enthusiast to talk about their coffee at home, creativity, and everything in between. Today, I have the privilege of sitting down to chat with Kyle Rowsell. Kyle has been creating coffee content for about a year now on Instagram and YouTube. But he's been helping others brew wonderful coffee at home way before that. Kyle is one of the most open and enthusiastic people in the coffee social media world. I loved hearing about his passion to teach others about coffee, his creative process, and some things you'd like to see in the future of the coffee industry. I hope you enjoy this inaugural episode. All right, we'll get started. All right. Well, I think a lot of people will know who you are. But who is Kyle Rowsell. What do you do in the coffee world?

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah. So right now I'm doing a lot of coffee education and content on social platforms. platforms like Instagram is really where a lot of my influence started. And now really taking a hold of YouTube started YouTube in the fall. And I just hit 10,000 subscribers today, which I'm really grateful for. And those two platforms are really what I do and what I try to do. And my goal and my vision is to help the home barista make better coffee at home. And that might be a person who has been in coffee for 10 plus years, it might be somebody who's just entering this role of coffee. But ultimately, my vision is to help them see coffee for more than just a morning, get up and go, just a fix of caffeine. But something that can be so much more than that. I think coffee is so wonderful. It's so diverse. And it's such a wonderful hobby to be in. And so my goal is to within helping people brew better coffees also shift their perspective on what this beverage can be. And so yeah, I do that through recipes and tutorials and educating on the farmer, the producer, the importer, things like that. And then also just doing reviews on equipment, and my brew bar and vlogs and all that kind of stuff, too. So within all of that, I've been able to help a few people. And I'm grateful for that.

Brian Renshaw:

Very cool. I think I found you at the start of the year, and just been fallen ever since and get a chance to talk to you a little bit. It's been it's been fun. All right. So what was your kind of inspiration? You know, to be helping people with coffee? You're very passionate about it. And so how did that kind of start?

Kyle Rowsell:

So this has been a passion of mine for years, probably dates back to 2016 when I started helping people within specialty coffee. And the passion started from just seeing what this could be, you know, for me, I've been into coffee since man I don't even know 15 years old. And, and I've always been into coffee, but I've always been into like, you know, when I was into coffee into you know, here in Canada, Tim Hortons, you know, and then that trickled into Starbucks. And I thought Starbucks was the best thing since sliced bread. And then that turned into brewing like Italian style espresso at home on my barista Express when I got one of those. And that kind of just continue to snowball. And then one of my friends here in Ottawa took me to a specialty cafe as as, as I was trying to educate him on how awesome my Lavazza beans from Costco were. And he was like, dude, let me let me take you to this cafe here in the city. And we sat down, it was my first ever experience of specialty coffee. And I remember the barista. He sat us down, we had a brew bar. And he brought me a Chemex. And I was fascinated, like, What is this thing? Like, is that a bong is that like, and he explained it and kind of walk me through what he was doing. And it was a moment that really shifted, and it was a naturally processed Ethiopian coffee that he was brewing me very similar to what I was drinking today. And it tastes like blueberries. And I remember thinking to my friend, like, why are we drinking flavored coffee? That doesn't make sense. And just getting education and understanding on No, this is literally just the purest form of coffee. This is what coffee can be. And it was like an eye opener moment, man. And so for me now that was like a big monumental moment in my life. And so I want to now be able to help people have that same experience, where it's like coffee can be more than just this this beverage that you may know it as. So for me now, man I in COVID that's kind of when the social media stuff started happening. I was doing a blog before that. But I took the social media because I had more spare time. And it seemed like social media was becoming very, very popular in this COVID season, although it was already popular, it was like a spike. And I was like, You know what, I'm gonna get into this. So started helping people through Instagram. And, you know, the rest is history. But yeah, I've been helping people for years in specialty coffee. I oversee a wholesale account. And part of this also helping people purchase coffee. And many people who don't buy specialty, normally helping them on that path to buying specialty over, like grocery. And so that's how it started. And that's where we're at today.

Brian Renshaw:

That's, that's awesome. So you do a little bit of work in coffee. Helping sell sell some coffee?

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah, I wouldn't say necessarily. It's my job. Yeah, just something that I oversee. And it's just overseeing a wholesale account and working with some roasters here in Canada, some in the States, but it's not necessarily part of my job, per se. It is definitely a bit of it. But I wouldn't classify that so much as maybe other people working in coffee, for sure. A little bit. I dabble. I dabble.

Brian Renshaw:

My coffee experience was I was a barista at Starbucks and in college for a little bit. And I got started roasting my own beans and kind of got on that route. But I was like you the Italian style espresso, you know, super dark rose, drink as much coffee as you can throughout the day. And that was that was my journey. To now. But so, you know, I think you answered this on on a recent video. But why do you? Why do you what is Kyle brew coffee at home?

Kyle Rowsell:

Well, I mean, it started, it started out as necessity. Being in the suburbs, I actually didn't have access to a cafe every day, and then just save money, right? So that started out as, hey, I this the cheapest forum for me to brew good coffee, is to do it at home. I think that's the case for so many people, right? Hey, I can't get to a coffee shop, I can't brew or I can't spend three $4 a day on a coffee. So I'm going to brew it at home. You know, that's why I got an espresso machine at home. And I didn't want to be spending five bucks at Starbucks at the time, every single drink, right? And so but that snowballed into No, this isn't just a necessity, this is actually a preference. And that shift was very interesting going from No, I have to do this to know I actually want to do this. And so why brew at home now it gives me a lot of flexibility in what I can drink. I truly like to experiment. And I truly like to dive into just different recipes and perfect my craft. I'm a perfectionist and everything that I do, I obsess over little details. If that's coffee, photography, video, whatever it might be. And, and so for me brewing at home is is a hobby. And, and more than that, it's actually like an art. And so for me, it's it's so much more than just I have to brew at home because it's the cheapest option. For me, it's actually the best option. I feel like I can really extract flavors in a way that I prefer not to say a cafe Can I go to my local cafes, you know, every week, but for me, it's it's truly fun. It's awesome. I get excited every morning, man to get up, go downstairs and turn on that kettle and try something new in my v 60 or brew recipe that I brewed yesterday. That just was amazing. Like that gets me excited. And I might be the minority in that. But I think it's just so excellent.

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, I think once you once you start getting on that route and the difficulty of you know, trying to learn how to brew your own coffee, and you can kind of why'd that ride that wave? It becomes it becomes enjoyable. Yeah. So what was your first kind of brewing device at home? When you kind of started that route? Besides your espresso machine with the you know, dark roast?

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah, I know, this machine was my first which is, again, maybe a minority in that. But other than that my first manual brewing device was a chemex. And that kind of trace back to my experience at that cafe. And so for me, chemex was really what started off brewing coffee at home, but also was the thing that actually stopped it too. And so I made a video on this a few months ago. Yeah, let's guess day you. You had a recent video goodbye. Well, it was a goodbye to the gimmicks. Yeah, and it was a controversial one. And I think you have to actually watch it to see my result in that what I'm not saying is don't use the chemex. I was just saying, here's my experience with the chemex. And this is why I don't use it today. But within that video, I'm saying, hey, if you use the chemex awesome, keep doing it. I did get a lot of hate for that one.

Brian Renshaw:

I'm sure you did!

Kyle Rowsell:

So the chemex was the first Brewer that I had. And that was great. But I had a pretty terrible grinder at the time. And it resulted in a lot of fines migration, in other words, it was stalling. And I was getting very frustrated with my brewing. And so I stopped brewing manually for probably a year and a half a long time. And I was straight up just doing espresso. Yeah, like, I just had no patience for manual brewing at all. Because of the frustrations I had, I tried to v60. But it just, I just didn't put enough time in to learn that craft. And so the chemex started me off in that journey. But it also halted me in many ways. And I know that others have actually walked that journey as well. And that's kind of why I shared my experience. Again, that's, that's on me. I didn't put enough time to learn it. But I think a lot of people do get frustrated and kind of give up. And, yeah, it the gimmicks to answer your question was it. But it was also the thing that actually paused my growth, isn't it interesting?

Brian Renshaw:

I think a lot of us have a love hate relationship with with the gimmicks, I think I finally dialed in kind of a standard recipe I use if there's three or four of us that are that are drinking a cup, but it's, it's not something I use quite a bit there.

Kyle Rowsell:

And not to say that the chemex is bad, I now use the chemex. You know, again, for bigger cups, and when companies over actually really love the chemex for what it is. I just think it's so interesting. And this is why I don't suggest it to be the first Brewer for so many, because for me my first experience with the chemex wasn't a good one. You know, it was the one that actually inspired me to get into brewing coffee, but it also really frustrated me. And so it's it's an interesting brewery, isn't it?

Brian Renshaw:

It is it is? There's, I would say less flexibility than you have with other options. And it does tend to choke and you can get some of that bitterness going on. So, you know, you had that hiatus of pour overs for about a year and a half. You know, what, you know, now, what do you wish you would have told Kyle, you know, before then, to kind of avoid that experience? Besides, you know, don't use a chemex?

Kyle Rowsell:

I love the resources that are available today. And educating brewing coffee at home. Those weren't available to me when I was learning. And this is one of the reasons why I do what I do. I think back then, when I was looking, what am I doing wrong in the chemex I didn't have anybody to help me in that. I had to figure it out myself, you know, back then I don't even think James Hoffman was on YouTube. You know, like it was, it was a pretty scarce world. I think, you know, if you wanted to figure out what you were doing, you had to go on YouTube and search up like Seattle coffee gear like that was that, you know, that was the only you know, and and so I think if I could turn back the clock as being able to. Yeah, I think being able just to put in the research, you know, I know there were tons of blogs and, and other resources out there. But being able to understand what I was doing wrong is big. I think. And that's why I'm so excited about where our specialty is today is just understanding that there is so many resources available so many YouTube videos on the Instagram posts. You know, James Hoffman is just really leading the way in all of this. And there's so many great resources. It really is. And it's a good time to get into coffee more now than ever, right? Yep. So I don't know how to really answer your question, man. I think it was a turn back the clock, I would just make sure that, hey, don't give up there is a possible way to make good coffee out of what you're brewing. But just putting the research in, but I think yeah, it's kind of tough, because back then there wasn't a ton of resources available. And so you kind of had to figure it out. Figure it out yourself. Yeah, it was an interesting roll, man. So I'm just so excited going back to it on the positive loop to see where coffee is today. Because again, to repeat myself, there's just no better time to get into this craft

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, I would agree. I you know, I think, you know, one of the problems we have now is there is so much out there that what I when I talk with people, it's almost kind of a stumbling block because there's competing information. It's, there's so many kind of click Beatty titles like this is the best way or this is the only way and I think you and I would probably both agree here that There are multiple ways to make a really good cup of coffee that you enjoy. So how would you help people navigate? You know, besides just listening to just listen to Kyle and you know, go to your YouTube channel, but like, how to navigate what to listen to? And how to kind of take in all that information if they're wanting to improve brewing at home?

Kyle Rowsell:

Well, the first thing I would say is, don't just listen to me. So I think that's a big thing, right? Like I am an opinionated person, I try to take the approach of Hey, I'm not always correct, I try to take that humble approach. But sometimes it might not come off that way, or somebody might not perceive it that way. So even in one of my recent videos, I mentioned, hey, this is one of my recipes. But this isn't the ultimate way to brew coffee, like there are so many ways to brew coffee at home. And this shouldn't be the only recipe that you brew, but this is one that I use. So here it is. And I think that's the approach that I would encourage anybody listening this today to take in educating anybody is, Hey, there isn't only one way to brew. Now, that being said, having a specific recipe for beginners is a good idea. I think it really actually does help them out, because then they can figure out the variables in their brewing. If you give a beginner 17 recipes, they're just going to be overwhelmed. So I think giving them one recipe, you know, maybe that's James Hoffman's ultimate recipe for V60. Very easy, single pour single bloom, give a couple stirs. And you're done. Now I can figure out okay, it's my grind size to fine is my grind size too coarse. You know, what am I doing wrong here? How am I pouring? How am I agitating the coffee does my grinder suck? and allows that to happen? Yep. But I think once that is accomplished, what I've kind of seen trending is that that's the only recipe I'm ever gonna prove. Right. And that might not even be said, but even subconsciously, every single coffee that they brew is only this one single recipe. And so my encouragement is for people who are seeing all this content being created this excellent content, is to take it each with a grain of salt. Understanding that coffee is very subjective in the way that we educate each other. And there are no objective truths within coffee. But when it comes to recipes, and brew methods, take it, learn it and then adopt it to your own, and then continue to try new things is really key. There are so many opinions going around right now. And I'm stoked about that. But yeah, I think don't get up in arms with anything that you hear or read, especially from somebody who's not, you know, per se, educated within this coffee industry, myself included. But just being open to new ideas is great, but not taking it as absolute. This is truth. But rather just this is an idea that I want to adapt.

Brian Renshaw:

I think that's I think that's really helpful. So I think related, how would you describe good coffee? So, you know, when we get into the specialty coffee world, you know, people will be like, well, I just like really good coffee, and I don't like bad coffee. But we also say that coffee is highly subjective. So how would you define, you know, what is good coffee, and when you're talking to somebody trying to get them to go to the specialty coffee world and explore those options.

Kyle Rowsell:

I'm probably the wrong person to ask this, Brian. I might not give you the answer that you're wanting.

Brian Renshaw:

I don't but I don't have a specific answer to this.

Kyle Rowsell:

I think any coffee that somebody is enjoying at home is good coffee. I don't I'm not the coffee snob to say that you have to drink this coffee only. Now I'm gonna I'm gonna add some context to that in a second. But I truly believe that the coffee that one is drinking at home, if you're enjoying that coffee, like Brian, if you're sitting at home drinking that dark roast Lavazza Good for you, man, like, if that's getting you happy, if that makes you happy? Sure. But this is what I would say it can't stop there. Right? Like I would say, if you're enjoying that, keep enjoying that. But understand that there's a reality within coffee that we need to address. So going back to my coffee is more than caffeine. I think that needs to be something that's educated and explored. You know, if you're enjoying coffee at home, I would say that's good coffee. But what's great coffee or what is coffee that is ethical. What is coffee that is more than just a caffeine fix. I think that's where we can dive into specialty. Not on the basis of flavor per se, but basis on how its sourced. how it's being paid to the farmer, the importer and the exporter, the producer. Those are things that are I'm really passionate about. I could care less about I shouldn't say care less. I should I care a little bit less about how you perceive flavors. I care more about how that coffee got to your home. Is that fair? Like I think that's that's helpful. Cool. Yeah, I think that's a big thing for me is Hey, you enjoy what you enjoy you You know, if you like your steak medium rare or you like your steak Well done, that's not for me to say. But where? Where did your steak come from? Yeah, that's another conversation.

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, those are definitely two different conversations. I think those conversations can be difficult, especially when you're trying to introduce people to coffees that allow you to explore different flavors where I would say, what is often qualified as bad coffee kind of has, you know, more of a flat taste, everything kind of tastes the same, and you're not able to explore that. So related to that, what would what do you want to see different kind of in the specialty coffee industry? Or emphasized in the community around that?

Kyle Rowsell:

This is a good topic. So I've been really talking through content, especially in 2020. On the approachability within specialty coffee. And I think that's an area that this industry can continue to grow in. I think we've definitely, as I've been mentioning, taking leaps and bounds to do better at what we have been doing. But I think we're not done. You know, I think we need to continue to address the idea of approachability within specialty. For right now, I'm trying to get into a little off topic, but I'm trying to get into a new hobby. And it's called, like FPV drones. I don't know if you've ever seen them.

Brian Renshaw:

I don't think I have.

Kyle Rowsell:

Okay, so it's basically your basic drone, but you would put on like a pair of goggles, and you'd fly it through the perspective of that drone. And they can do acro, and they can do all these cool tricks. It's it's a pretty cool hobby. But I'm finding getting into to FPV. Drones is the hardest thing ever. You've got to like build your drone, you've got to figure out like LiPo batteries, you got to figure out how to solder and all these crazy elements. It's really scaring me from getting into this hobby. And I'm somebody who's willing to put in the work to figure out how to do it. I'll watch YouTube videos, I'll watch hours of content to figure out how to get into something if I think it's something that's worthwhile. With specialty, I think that's not so much the case right now, which excites me, I think like if you want to get into specialty, you can just YouTube, like how to brew coffee at home. And you'll find half a dozen videos that are worth watching. And you should be able to get on a good, good, good go like you should be able to get into it pretty easily. So that excites me. But I think that things like tasting notes are something that I'm still trying to navigate and figure out where I stand on. I released the coffee last year called tropical juice box. And the idea behind it was I'm going to remove all tasting notes from this coffee. And as somebody who's not a roaster, I can just do this without having any really impact on a business. And I'm going to name it something that I think that the coffee represents. And then on the back of the coffee bag, I actually had a spot where people could put in the notes that it reminds them of impressions that the coffee gives them. And that was a cool experiment. Because what I'm finding is in talking to people, especially overseeing this wholesale account and navigating just people buying coffee, one thing that they often look for is not varietals and processing methods or elevation or region. Rather, it's one of the tasting notes on the bag. Right? And I find myself in that spot so often too. I don't know about you. But that's one thing that can really shift somebody in buying coffee. Now, that's fine. But the problem with that is, if I'm somebody who buys a coffee that says root beer tasting note, and then I get the coffee and I'm expecting group here, and I don't get that Yep. That's where things get really interesting. It is now for me and you who somebody into coffee and understands that we can we can decipher Okay, well this is this is subjective tasting note, like this is something that the roaster decided put on the bag. Maybe I don't taste this, we can understand that. But if somebody's just getting into coffee, it can be very confusing. Like when you're buying coffee. I've heard people say, Oh, I don't like I don't want. I don't want watermelon flavored coffee. Right? No, you know, like this. This is not flavored, right? I think we're doing better as time goes on. I think social media platforms have helped people, but I get these questions daily, you know, my DMS are always filled with, I'm gonna buy this coffee. What are your thoughts on this? Or did you enjoy that coffee as you're drinking and I noticed the tasting notes for something I'm not really interested in. And those are interesting conversations. So I think that's one area within specialty that I'd like to see continue to develop and grow. Is the conversation on tasting notes. You know, I've had some great conversations with some roasters here in Canada, and I'm not saying get rid of them. I'm definitely not saying that because I think they're very valuable. They help us really understand the direction of the coffee, but they definitely do leave us with confirmation bias. And we walk away saying I expect this therefore I'm going to taste this and sometimes we actually taste something just because it's written on a bag. Right now Yeah, and that might not be a bad thing either. Right. But there's a lot of thoughts I have within tasting notes. And I've always said in the past, but I think that's one area that I'd love to see grow in this industry.

Brian Renshaw:

So if we're talking about tasting notes, and you know, for that's, I would say kind of somebody that's in a little bit more advanced in coffee understanding, but somebody that's kind of at the beginning of their journey, they're looking to go beyond like, Folgers or all these coffee, and you're trying to help them buy a bag of coffee, and you don't want to have the tasting note discussion. What are some things that you recommend for them to look for?

Kyle Rowsell:

I think if somebody is trying to move from something like Folgers, I think getting into blends are a good idea. Now, I might get criticized for saying that, but I do think that that's a good stepping stone. Maybe not the end goal, but I definitely think single origins, first of all, are harder to brew consistently, you know, and can be very more extravagant, more exotic. And so if somebody wants to get into coffee, but doesn't want to worry about tasting those, try out a blend, like a reputable blend from a good roaster will guaranteed to be good, like they put their work in because that's the coffee that's gonna sell the most for them. By far, you know, so in Canada, we have some amazing roasters and not everybody does blends. You know, one of my favorite roasters in Canada is Monogram, they don't do blends, they instead actually called one of their single origins, the Warmth, filter, and so, or Warmth, espresso, and Warmth is just kind of in line with their, their mission statement. And so it kind of works in with their branding, but there's a single origin, but if I'm getting into it, I can go okay, well, I don't know what all these other coffees mean. But that's their warmth. That's what they use at their cafes. I'm going to take that one home. So for people getting into specialty, and want to try good coffee, but are a little concerned about tasting notes, I would say start off on blends, you know, espresso filter, whatever it might be. But even talking to baristas like, if you go into a cafe, I'm guaranteed if you say hey, I'm new to coffee, and I want one of your coffees, what coffee should I buy? Like, we need to see that happen more? Right? And rather than rather than always ask them like me, go to a cafe, ask the barista, like, I don't know about that caught. I haven't tried every coffee in the world, right? And talking to the cafe, talking to the roaster, hitting them up in the DMS like Yo, I want to buy some your coffee, which one should I buy? If I don't want something, they're not gonna get offended by that. They're stoked that you're just trying out coffee. So I think that's another good idea, as well as just having those conversations.

Brian Renshaw:

And if you if you have a local place, I mean, the best place to have that conversation is ask the barista they, they're gonna get asked that all the time, and they're gonna be able to recommend, you know, most places have one or two blends to recommend, and it's a good place to start there. Yeah. So what is your favorite brew method? So if you had to get rid of kind of everything, and you had to do one pourover method for the next year? What would you be using?

Kyle Rowsell:

Brian?

Brian Renshaw:

I know, I know. You can't ask me this question. But I can ask you.

Kyle Rowsell:

Is that how this works? Okay.

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, ha

Kyle Rowsell:

I think if I had to get rid of every brew method, but one, it would be the v60. I think the v60 for sure. I personally have a deep love for that brewer. It's not the brewer I use daily, but it is the gold standard on my brew bar. Right. So if I'm getting a new coffee, and I want to figure out what I find the impressions are of that coffee, it's going to be on the v60. It's not going to be on the stag, it's not going to be on the chemex. It's not going to be on the kalita those will come but often for me the first Brewer that comes out of my closet, out of my brew bar is is the v60. The ceramic white v60. And with the with the v60. Filters with the little What is it the little tab?

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah

Kyle Rowsell:

Those are the ones that I always use.

Brian Renshaw:

The one the ones that people hate on?

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah, it's not the fastest. I know the v60 has multiple if you're listening, you're like what does it matter? aureo has different filters. And apparently they flow different. James Hoffman has done a video on it. Yeah, but I just use the tab ones because you can buy them in packs of 100.

Brian Renshaw:

Yep, exactly.

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah. You know, that's that's kind of what I go to man is just that Brewer those filters. And for me, it might not always be the best cup of coffee. compared to some other brewers right now. I'm really enjoying the orea I believe you have one as well, right? Yeah. It's it's been the one Brewer that I've been kind of most excited about like, yeah, that's been new. That I've just really taken to using all the time. Yeah, definitely. It's been pretty great. But I would not recommend the Orea for somebody new into coffee. And I'm working on a YouTube video right now on this. And I personally think it's one of the coolest breweries that I've seen in the past 12 months, for sure. Maybe even past two years. And yeah, one that I'm really excited about, but I definitely wouldn't recommend it's a new brewers, because that faster brew rate is going to confuse people. Like, why is my coffee really taking a minute? 32 drawn out, right, right. And, and you're gonna get a lot of sour flavors, and depending on your grinder just might not be ideal. So for me the v60. Is it and I love so many brew methods, man, it's really hard to answer that right?

Brian Renshaw:

It is. Yeah, so do you use your aeropress? much?

Kyle Rowsell:

Dude, it's such a good question. I do, depending on the season of the year. I really love iced Aeropress. Okay, it's one of my favorite is one of my favorite iced coffees. I love the immersion mix with like iced coffee. Just flash freezing it. That one's great. I also have really taken to the Clever Dripper as well, which is, you know, immersion as well. And those two brewers they're there. They're OGs, man, they're OGs within the coffee industry.

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah.

Kyle Rowsell:

Right. But they're so good. But I don't use it as often as I wish. I wish I used the Aeropress a little bit more. But I do have some great recipes on that. It's just yeah, I find that the multiple pieces is what gets me right. I have to take the cap off. I have to find the I don't know, I'm a baby.

Brian Renshaw:

I have lost multiple caps. And, or i or i take it to travel. And that's the one thing I forget, which is the one thing you need to make an Aeropress. Yeah, man. So yeah, the Clever. That's been my kind of like quick brew lately. It produces a really good cup.

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah. So, so good. underrated, for sure. And it was so good to see James Hoffman come up with a ultimate recipe for that. I think that was game changing for so many.

Brian Renshaw:

Well, James Hoffman is game changing for most everybody at some point in the coffee world. So just a couple discussions on your coffee creator life? Have you always been into photography and videography? Or is that something that's been kind of a parallel path with your coffee creations?

Kyle Rowsell:

Alright, we're going to get into this, I have only shared this once before, and it wasn't on another podcast. But I actually didn't own a camera one year ago. When I got into starting posting on Instagram, I didn't think it would become what it is now. And I started taking photos on my iPhone 10. So if you scroll back all the way to the bottom of my feed, you'll notice man, there's a shift in the perspective of clarity, the sharpness and the photos. It's all iPhone 10 photos. And so halfway through probably the summer I invested in a camera. And that one only lasted a few months. But again, like I said, with my personality I do you obsess over things. And so I learned a ton about photography in a short amount of time. I made a ton of mistakes and learn from those mistakes. And same with videography. So I've always been into it. I just never own the gear to actually learn it. Yeah. And so it's new man, like last summer was when I got into it. And that's the same with like filmmaking. And that's the same with Yeah, everything that I do. It was last June, I bought a Canon EOS RP. And then I bought some lenses. I got a 50mm 1.4 and I got a 35mm. And that's what got me into it. And then a few months later I upgraded to the R. This was before the R5and R6. And so I upgraded to that I love the mirrorless system. I love the the fact that just the autofocus is wonderful for video. And yeah, it was just nice and light and small. And so I upgraded to the Canon EOSR. I didn't really consider Sony at the time. But if I could go back man I being so in the video, I might have taken the Sony route.

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, Sony's great.

Kyle Rowsell:

You shoot Sony right?

Brian Renshaw:

Yeah, Sony A7iii

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah, that's a wonderful camera, man. And honestly, if I could turn it back, I probably would have gone down that route. But I have so many lenses now that it's kind of hard to swap. So I might end up with the Canon R6 or R5 in the next six months. We'll see.

Brian Renshaw:

You got started one year after I did I got started. When my son was turning one in July. In 2019 I got a camera to take photos of him. And then the coffee thing has been new new for me this year.

Kyle Rowsell:

Yeah, that's awesome, man. You're doing a great job.

Brian Renshaw:

Alright, let's do a couple or several lightning round questions, which I haven't prepped you for or anything. So just looking for, you know, first thing that pops in your head and one or two word answers. Alright, so if you could buy any coffee right now what would you buy?

Kyle Rowsell:

Oh buddy, Ethiopia.

Brian Renshaw:

Ethiopia. Natural or washed?

Kyle Rowsell:

Natural.

Brian Renshaw:

What's your favorite summer activity?

Kyle Rowsell:

Swimming

Brian Renshaw:

What's your biggest frustration when brewing coffee?

Kyle Rowsell:

Stalling brews

Brian Renshaw:

If you had to listen to one song on repeat the rest of your life while you brew coffee. What would it be?

Kyle Rowsell:

I listened to lo-fi music.

Brian Renshaw:

Is that is that a specific song?

Kyle Rowsell:

No, it's not. I don't know a song. Yeah, I don't know. I don't got anything.

Brian Renshaw:

This goes into our tasting note question. But what's your favorite tasting note?

Kyle Rowsell:

Peach.

Brian Renshaw:

How tall are you?

Kyle Rowsell:

I'm 6'0.

Brian Renshaw:

And what's your favorite beverage besides coffee?

Kyle Rowsell:

Bubbly water.

Brian Renshaw:

That's mine as well. And then if I say specialty coffee, what's the first word that pops in your mind?

Kyle Rowsell:

Direct trade

Brian Renshaw:

Well, this has been a really fun conversation. I want to ask where can people find you on social media? I think you have Instagram, YouTube, and a blog.

Kyle Rowsell:

Thanks, man. So people can find me at kyle.rowsell on Instagram. People often think it's Roswell. It's not, the w before the s. And then on YouTube, Kyle Rowsell.

Brian Renshaw:

And you recently changed that from brew at home.

Kyle Rowsell:

I swapped that over in the fall. So yeah, everything's just under one brand now, which is just my personal brand. I took that shift and in the end of last year. So yeah, Kyle Rowsell for everything.

Brian Renshaw:

I really appreciate you taking time out of your day to join me and talking about all things coffee. And yeah, I hope you have a great day.

Kyle Rowsell:

Brian, thank you so much for having me, man. I'm honored. And I'm grateful to have this conversation with you.

Brian Renshaw:

Awesome. I hope you enjoyed this episode with Kyle Rowsell. Kyle is always such a fun guy to talk to about coffee, creativity, and just life. If you enjoyed this episode, I encourage you to subscribe as there will be new episodes every week. And one of the best ways to get the news out about this new podcast is to leave a review on iTunes. That helps just get the news out and help the algorithms for podcasts. If you listen on Spotify, leave a review on there as well. That would just be so helpful as we get started here. As always, you can find me on Instagram @_freshly_brewed and I hope to see you again